Reopening will get Orange County 100,000 jobs, says Chapman forecast

Our “crystal ball” feature helps decipher numerous forecasts that ponder the future ups and downs of the economy.

Buzz: An ongoing reopening and recovering of the California economy will translate to Orange County adding 100,000 jobs in the second half of this year — leaving the region at 98% of its pre-pandemic employment when 2021 is done.

Source: My trusty spreadsheet’s analysis of the semiannual economic forecast by Chapman University’s A. Gary Anderson Center for Economic Research.

The Trend

Orange County’s job count jumping by 100,000 between the second quarter and year’s end to 1.64 million, Chapman says. State jobs records show that’s far above last year’s second-half increase (61,000) and nearly six times bigger than the average finish of a year this century (18,000) before the pandemic.

But if Chapman’s correct, when 2022 starts the local economy will be 42,000 workers short — or 98% — of 2020’s first quarter employment when we didn’t know coronavirus. During the lockdown period of the early pandemic era, Orange County was down 275,000 jobs.

The dissection

Much of the projected hiring spree to come — as well as the pandemic era’s jobs shortfall — can be tied to leisure and hospitality industries that were battered by mandates designed to slow the spread of coronavirus and the public’s reluctance to travel.

Chapman’s forecast calls for these “fun” businesses that typically pay low wages to add 39,000 workers in the second half to 193,000. But that will still be 30,000 short — or 87% of pre-virus levels.

Professional services — primarily good-paying, white-collar work — is expected to grow by 16,000 jobs in the next six months to 330,000 — that’s 4,000 above or 101% of pre-virus levels.

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And a hot housing market will help construction add 4,000 workers to 112,000 — 7,000 above pre-virus levels.

Chapman wrote: “This rapid recovery is in stark contrast to the steep decline over a three-year period that took place during the Great Recession of 2007-09.”

Other key job niches …

Manufacturing: Adds 9,000 in second half to 159,000 at year’s end — 1,000 above or 101% of pre-virus levels.

Financial services: Up 7,000 to 124,000 — 5,000 above or 104% of pre-virus levels.

Retail: Up 4,000 to 146,000 but still 2,000 short — or 99% of pre-virus levels.

Education and health industries: Up 4,000 to 231,000, but still 6,000 short — or 97% of pre-virus levels.

Government: Up 1,000 to 154,000 but still 13,000 short — or 92% of pre-virus levels.

Caveat

The rebound has been a divided upswing — heavily favoring better-paid workers who could do their jobs remotely.

Consider that despite a not-so-full jobs recovery, personal income is forecast to grow 7% for all of 2021 to 114% of pre-virus 2019 levels. Many folks — but not all — are doing will, financially speaking.

And a big reason for a wealth factor driving the rebound: The median selling price of an existing Orange County single-family home is forecast to jump 15.5% this year to $1.03 million after rising 8.6% in 2020.

Chapman wrote: “With housing affordability already decreasing rapidly as the median home price in OC barrels over $1 million, we anticipate downward pressure on housing appreciation over the next two years.”

Bottom line

Spending will rebound with reopenings and more hirings. That should provide a firm foundation for the upswing.

Note: Chapman forecasts taxable sales countywide to jump 12% this year to just above 2019 levels.

Jonathan Lansner is business columnist for the Southern California News Group. He can be reached at jlansner@scng.com


Source: Orange County Register

Biden, Putin set consultations on updating nuclear pact

By JONATHAN LEMIRE, VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV and AAMER MADHANI

GENEVA (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin says he and U.S. President Joe Biden agreed in a “constructive” summit Wednesday to return their nations’ ambassadors to their posts and begin negotiations to replace the last remaining treaty between the two countries limiting nuclear weapons.

Putin said there was “no hostility” during the talks that wrapped up more quickly than expected.

The two sides had said they expected to meet for four to five hours but spent less than three hours together, including an opening meeting with just the two presidents and each one’s top foreign aide.

When it was over, Putin had first crack at describing the results at a solo news conference, with Biden to follow with his own session with reporters.

Putin acknowledged that Biden raised human rights issues with him, including the fate of opposition leader Alexei Navalny. Putin defended Navalny’s prison sentence and deflected repeated questions about mistreatment of Russian opposition leaders by highlighting U.S. domestic turmoil, including the Black Lives Matter protests and the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

Putin held forth for nearly an hour before international reporters. While showing defiance at queries about Biden pressing him on human rights, he also expressed a significant measure of respect for Biden as an experienced political leader.

The Russian leader noted that Biden repeated wise advice his mother had given him and also spoke about his family — messaging that Putin said might not have been entirely relevant to their summit but demonstrated Biden’s “moral values.” Though he raised doubt that the U.S.-Russia relationship could soon return to a measure of equilibrium of years past, Putin suggested that Biden was someone he could work with.

“The meeting was actually very efficient,” Putin said. “It was substantive, it was specific. It was aimed at achieving results, and one of them was pushing back the frontiers of trust.”

Putin said he and Biden agreed to begin negotiations on nuclear talks to potentially replace the New START treaty limiting nuclear weapons after it expires in 2026.

Washington broke off talks with Moscow in 2014 in response to Russia’s annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea and its military intervention in support of separatists in eastern Ukraine. Talks resumed in 2017 but gained little traction and failed to produce an agreement on extending the New START treaty during the Trump administration.

The Russian president said there was an agreement between the leaders to return their ambassadors to their respective postings. Both countries had pulled back their top envoys to Washington and Moscow as relations chilled in recent months.

Russia’s ambassador to the U.S., Anatoly Antonov, was recalled from Washington about three months ago after Biden called Putin a killer; U.S. Ambassador to Russia John Sullivan left Moscow almost two months ago, after Russia suggested he return to Washington for consultations. Putin said that the ambassadors were expected to return their posts in the coming days.

Putin also said the two sides agreed in principle to begin consultations on cybersecurity issues, though he continued to deny U.S. allegations that Russian government was responsible for a spate of recent high-profile hacks against business and government agencies in the United States and around the globe.

The meeting in a book-lined room had a somewhat awkward beginning — both men appeared to avoid looking directly at each other during a brief and chaotic photo opportunity before a scrum of jostling reporters.

Biden nodded when a reporter asked if Putin could be trusted, but the White House quickly sent out a tweet insisting that the president was “very clearly not responding to any one question, but nodding in acknowledgment to the press generally.”

Their body language, at least in their brief moments together in front of the press, was not exceptionally warm.

The two leaders did shake hands — Biden extended his hand first and smiled at the stoic Russian leader — after Swiss President Guy Parmelin welcomed them to Switzerland for the summit. When they were in front of the cameras a few minutes later—this time inside the grand lakeside mansion where the summit was held—they seemed to avoid eye contact.

For months, Biden and Putin have traded sharp rhetoric. Biden has repeatedly called out Putin for malicious cyberattacks by Russian-based hackers on U.S. interests, for the jailing of Russia’s foremost opposition leader and for interference in American elections.

Putin has reacted with whatabout-isms and denials — pointing to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol to argue that the U.S. has no business lecturing on democratic norms and insisting that the Russian government hasn’t been involved in any election interference or cyberattacks despite U.S. intelligence showing otherwise.

In advance of Wednesday’s meeting, both sides set out to lower expectations.

Even so, Biden said it was an important step if the United States and Russia were able to ultimately find “stability and predictability” in their relationship, a seemingly modest goal from the president for dealing with the person he sees as one of America’s fiercest adversaries.

Arrangements for the meeting were carefully choreographed and vigorously negotiated.

Biden first floated the meeting in an April phone call in which he informed Putin that he would be expelling several Russian diplomats and imposing sanctions against dozens of people and companies, part of an effort to hold the Kremlin accountable for interference in last year’s presidential election and the hacking of federal agencies.

The White House announced ahead of the summit that Biden wouldn’t hold a joint news conference with Putin, deciding it did not want to appear to elevate Putin at a moment when the U.S. president is urging European allies to pressure Putin to cut out myriad provocations.

Biden sees himself with few peers on foreign policy. He traveled the globe as a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and was given difficult foreign policy assignments by President Barack Obama when Biden was vice president. His portfolio included messy spots like Iraq and Ukraine and weighing the mettle of China’s Xi Jinping during his rise to power.

He has repeatedly said that he believes executing effective foreign policy comes from forming strong personal relations, and he has managed to find rapport with both the likes of Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whom Biden has labeled an “autocrat,” and more conventional Western leaders including Canada’s Justin Trudeau.

But with Putin, who he has said has “no soul,” Biden has long been wary. At the same time, he acknowledges that Putin, who has remained the most powerful figure in Russian politics over the span of five U.S. presidents, is not without talent.

“He’s bright. He’s tough,” Biden said earlier this week. “And I have found that he is a — as they say … a worthy adversary.”

Biden had prepared for his one-on-one by reviewing materials and consulting with officials across government and with outside advisers. Aides said the level of preparation wasn’t unusual. Biden, in a brief exchange with reporters upon a rriving in Geneva on Tuesday night, sought to offer the impression that he wasn’t sweating his big meeting.

“I am always ready,” Biden said.

___

Associated Press writer Zeke Miller in Washington and AP video journalist Daniel Kozin contributed reporting

—-

This story has been corrected to show that Geneva is not Switzerland’s capital.


Source: Orange County Register

Gov. Newsom’s coronavirus reopening tour rolls into Six Flags Magic Mountain

VALENCIA — Gov. Gavin Newsom renewed this week’s celebration inspired by the lifting of widespread pandemic measures by rolling into Six Flags Magic Mountain on Wednesday, June 16, aiming to encourage Californians to enjoy the state’s attractions to help rekindle the economy — and to roll up their sleeves if they have yet to be vaccinated.

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Coinciding with the state’s reopening drive, like most theme parks in the state, Six Flags has increased its attendance cap and ride capacities while ending its required mask policy for vaccinated attendees and reservation requirement. Newsom said the theme park will be giving away 50,000 free admission tickets to people who get their first COVID-19 vaccine dose at 65 select locations across the state.

The tickets are valid through Sept. 6 at any of Six Flags’ four parks in California — Magic Mountain and Hurricane Harbor in Valencia; Discovery Kingdom in Vallejo; or Hurricane Harbor Concord. A full list of the vaccine locations is available at Covid19.ca.gov/Vax-For-The-Win.

Newsom was also in Los Angeles County on Tuesday to mark the state’s “reopening day,” visiting Universal Studios Hollywood. Surrounded by Minions, Trolls and other Universal movie characters, he oversaw the drawing of the names of 10 lucky California residents who have been at least partially vaccinated against COVID-19. The winners receive $1.5 million each.

Gov. Gavin Newsom joined host James Corden on CBS’ The Late Late Show Tuesday night to talk about California’s reopening rules. Photo: State of California

The governor also appeared on The Late Late Show with James Corden on Tuesday night, laying out the state’s recovery blueprint.

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On Tuesday, California lifted coronavirus-spurred restrictions on capacity within businesses, ended the color-coded county tier system and removed mask requirements for fully vaccinated individuals. While the majority of COVID restrictions are lifted, mask-wearing will continue to be in effect in many situations, and businesses can continue requiring customers to wear them. Vaccination efforts will also continue, with the county Department of Public Health on Monday urging residents to get the shots, particularly with the Fourth of July holiday on the horizon.

Newsom aimed to keep the reopening vibe alive Wednesday at the Valencia park known for its high-octane thrill rides — more enjoyable roller coasters experiences than the kind the state has been on for the past 18 months, while the pandemic claimed more than 62,000 lives statewide.

The state’s “Safer at Home” orders, aimed at saving lives by slowing the spread of the virus, took a huge toll on such destinations as Six Flags, Newsom acknowledged.

“We took a sledge hammer to the entertainment industry in the last year because of the stay-at-home order, no one’s naive,” Newsom said. “There was one sector of our economy that was particularly impacted by this pandemic, and that was hospitality, restaurants and entertainment. … This is a sector we need to pay particular attention to. We need to be here not just when the cameras are here but long after to get this sector of our economy back on its feet.”

Newsom said the state is making a major investment to encourage a rejuvenation of tourism, and urged Californians to “rediscover their own state.”

The governor said the state’s economic rebound was under way, touting that 38% share of jobs created across the nation last month sprouted in California. “We don’t talk about California coming back,” Newsom said. “We talk about it, rightfully, as roaring back.”

When asked about his emotions over the last week, the governor affirmed that lifting virus restrictions was indeed thrilling, but his mind is already shifting to other concerns, as the temperature promised to soar over 100 on Wednesday: “Wildfire season is already here.”

Fifth District Supervisor Kathryn Barger echoed the governor’s plea to unvaccinated residents, touting the effort to attain herd immunity via more vaccines: “If you haven’t already,” she said before Newsom’s appearance, “please please please get vaccinated.”

Vaccinations in the state continue to increase as deaths and hospitalizations continue to decline. According to California’s official coronavirus website, nearly 19 million people are fully vaccinated with more than 10 million of those coming from Los Angeles County along.

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The governor didn’t give away any oversized checks on Wednesday, but the state’s “Vax for the Win” program will hold another vaccine-incentive drawing on July 1, giving away six California vacation packages, including trips to Anaheim, San Diego, Los Angeles, Rancho Mirage and San Francisco. Newsom said the incentives are working.

“California lays claim to being one of the few states that actually has seen a week-over-week increase in vaccine doses — 1.13 million people received at least a dose of vaccine over the last seven days, 219,000 yesterday in the last reporting period,” he said. “That’s a roughly 22% increase week-over-week in terms of vaccination rate, which is remarkable when you consider 72-plus percent of adults have already received one vaccine. But we cannot put down our guard.”

Meanwhile, more restrictions could be removed later this week. California’s Occupation Safety and Health Standards Board will consider revising workplace mask-wearing policy so that vaccinated workers would not have to wear masks while on the job. If they do choose to implement new standards, Newsom said he is ready to issue an executive order immediately adopting OSHA’s agreed upon standards.

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While the event was clearly meant to highlight California’s cautious strides back to normality, it also comes at a time when the governor is facing a possible recall, details of which should become more clear in the days ahead. More than 1.6 million people signed in favor of recall, enough votes to force an election. Counties still have to report the number of people who have taken their names off the petition, but with buffer room of more than 100,000 names the election seems imminent.

The recall is estimated to cost California taxpayers approximately $215 million.

Months ago, Newsom’s coronavirus response, which critics said put undue strain on small business, was cited as one of the key triggers for the recall. So while his victory lap is in full swing, his message of economic recovery will be tested in the lead-up to the vote.

“In the last 15 months under Gavin Newsom’s harshest-in-the-nation shutdowns, California’s children lost more than a year of in-person schooling, nearly 20,000 businesses permanently closed, unemployment skyrocketed, and his broken unemployment department continues ignoring more than a million Californians in need,” said Jessica Millan Patterson, chair of the state Republican Party. “While I’m thankful to finally be closer to joining the rest of the country that reopened long ago, I won’t forget the devastating experiences of too many Californians as a result of this governor’s one-man rule. Even now, as he claims our state is reopening, he’s refusing to give up his emergency powers.”

Changes in state and local pandemic policies are likely in the days ahead, providing the outbreak continues to yield. California’s mask-wearing guidance for the general public aligns largely with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations. The guidance allows fully vaccinated people to stop wearing masks in most situations. But they are still be required in certain settings for all people, regardless of vaccination status:

  • On public transit, including airplanes, ships, trains, buses, taxis and ride-hailing vehicles, and in transportation hubs such as airports, but terminals, train stations, seaports, marinas and subway stations;
  • Indoors at K-12 schools, child-care facilities and other youth settings;
  • Health-care settings, including long-term care facilities;
  • At state and local correctional facilities and detention centers; and
  • At homeless shelters, emergency shelters and cooling centers.

Masks are still required for unvaccinated people in indoor public settings and businesses such as retail stores, restaurants, theaters, movie theaters, family entertainment centers and government offices serving the public.

Business and event-venue operators can choose how to enforce those rules. According to the state, they have three options:

  • Businesses and venues can publicly post rules regarding mask-wearing and allow customers and visitors to “self-attest” that they are vaccinated, meaning if someone enters the business without a mask they are attesting to being vaccinated;
  • They can “implement a vaccine-verification system to determine whether individuals are required to wear a mask”; or
  • They can simply require all patrons to wear a mask.

City News Service contributed to this report. 

 


Source: Orange County Register

‘Two great powers’: Biden, Putin plunge into hours of talks

By AAMER MADHANI, JONATHAN LEMIRE and VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV

GENEVA (AP) — With stern expressions and polite words before the cameras, President Joe Biden and Russia’s Vladimir Putin plunged into hours of face-to-face talks Wednesday at a lush lakeside Swiss mansion, a highly anticipated summit at a time when both leaders say relations between their countries are at an all-time low.

Biden called it a discussion between “two great powers” and said it was “always better to meet face to face.” Putin said he hoped the talks would be “productive.”

The meeting in a book-lined room had a somewhat awkward beginning — both men appeared to avoid looking directly at each other during a brief and chaotic photo opportunity before a scrum of jostling reporters.

Biden nodded when a reporter asked if Putin could be trusted, but the White House quickly sent out a tweet insisting that the president was “very clearly not responding to any one question, but nodding in acknowledgment to the press generally.”

Putin ignored shouted questions from reporters, including whether he feared jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

The two leaders did shake hands — Biden extended his hand first and smiled at the stoic Russian leader — moments earlier when they posed with Swiss President Guy Parmelin, who welcomed them to Switzerland for the summit.

Biden and Putin first held a relatively intimate meeting joined by U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov. Each side had a translator for the session, which lasted about an hour and a half. The meeting, after about a 40-minute break, then expanded to include five senior aides on each side. Biden and Putin were expected to meet for a total of four to five hours of wide-ranging talks.

For months, they have traded sharp rhetoric. Biden has repeatedly called out Putin for malicious cyberattacks by Russian-based hackers on U.S. interests, for the jailing of Russia’s foremost opposition leader and for interference in American elections.

Putin has reacted with whatabout-isms and denials — pointing to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol to argue that the U.S. has no business lecturing on democratic norms and insisting that the Russian government hasn’t been involved in any election interference or cyberattacks despite U.S. intelligence showing otherwise.

In advance of Wednesday’s meeting, both sides set out to lower expectations.

Even so, Biden said it was an important step if the United States and Russia were able to ultimately find “stability and predictability” in their relationship, a seemingly modest goal from the president for dealing with the person he sees as one of America’s fiercest adversaries.

“We should decide where it’s in our mutual interest, in the interest of the world, to cooperate, and see if we can do that,” Biden told reporters earlier this week. “And the areas where we don’t agree, make it clear what the red lines are.”

Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told The Associated Press on Wednesday that no breakthroughs were expected and that “the situation is too difficult in Russian-American relations.” He added that “the fact that the two presidents agreed to meet and finally start to speak openly about the problems is already an achievement.”

Arrangements for the meeting were carefully choreographed and vigorously negotiated.

Biden first floated the meeting in an April phone call in which he informed Putin that he would be expelling several Russian diplomats and imposing sanctions against dozens of people and companies, part of an effort to hold the Kremlin accountable for interference in last year’s presidential election and the hacking of federal agencies.

Putin and his entourage arrived first at the summit site: Villa La Grange, a grand lakeside mansion set in Geneva’s biggest park. Next came Biden and his team. Putin flew into Geneva on Wednesday shortly before the scheduled start of the meeting; Biden — who was already in Europe for meetings with allies — arrived the day before.

After the meeting concludes, Putin is scheduled to hold a solo news conference, with Biden following suit. The White House opted against a joint news conference, deciding it did not want to appear to elevate Putin at a moment when the U.S. president is urging European allies to pressure Putin to cut out myriad provocations.

Biden sees himself with few peers on foreign policy. He traveled the globe as a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and was given difficult foreign policy assignments by President Barack Obama when Biden was vice president. His portfolio included messy spots like Iraq and Ukraine and weighing the mettle of China’s Xi Jinping during his rise to power.

He has repeatedly said that he believes executing effective foreign policy comes from forming strong personal relations, and he has managed to find rapport with both the likes of Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whom Biden has labeled an “autocrat,” and more conventional Western leaders including Canada’s Justin Trudeau.

But with Putin, who he has said has “no soul,” Biden has long been wary. At the same time, he acknowledges that Putin, who has remained the most powerful figure in Russian politics over the span of five U.S. presidents, is not without talent.

“He’s bright. He’s tough,” Biden said. “And I have found that he is a — as they say … a worthy adversary.”

The White House held on to hope of finding small areas of agreement.

No commitments have been made, but according to the senior administration official, there are hopes that both sides will return their ambassadors to their respective postings following the meeting. Russia’s ambassador to the U.S., Anatoly Antonov, was recalled from Washington about three months ago after Biden called Putin a killer; U.S. Ambassador to Russia John Sullivan left Moscow almost two months ago, after Russia suggested he return to Washington for consultations.

Biden administration officials say they think common ground can be found on arms control. International arms control groups are pressing the Russian and American leaders to start a push for new arms control agreements.

The Biden team will press its concerns on cybersecurity. In recent months, Russia-based hackers have launched alarming attacks on a major U.S. oil pipeline and a Brazil-headquartered meat supplier that operates in the U.S.

The Russian side has said that the imprisonment of Navalny, the jailed opposition leader, is an internal political matter and one area where Putin won’t engage on the matter. White House officials said, however, Biden intended to bring up the matter.

The meeting is sure to invite comparisons with President Donald Trump’s 2018 meeting with Putin in Helsinki, where the two leaders held a joint news conference and Trump sided with Russian denials when asked whether Moscow had meddled in the 2016 presidential election.

Biden has prepared for his one-on-one by reviewing materials and consulting with officials across government and with outside advisers. Aides said the level of preparation wasn’t unusual. Biden, in a brief exchange with reporters upon a rriving in Geneva on Tuesday night, sought to offer the impression that he wasn’t sweating his big meeting.

“I am always ready,” Biden said.

___

Associated Press writer Zeke Miller in Washington and AP video journalist Daniel Kozin contributed reporting

—-

This story has been corrected to show that Geneva is not Switzerland’s capital.


Source: Orange County Register

1 killed in crash on 73 toll road near Newport Beach, Irvine border

A person died when a sedan collided with another vehicle that overturned on the 73 toll road Tuesday, June 15, near the border of Newport Beach and Irvine.

The collision happened in southbound lanes near Jamboree Road at about 3:55 p.m., California Highway Patrol spokesman, Officer Tino Olivera, said. At least one witness reported seeing a white BMW 540i that may have been speeding before it struck an older red vehicle that rolled over during the crash, he said.

At least one person died in the collision, Olivera said. Coroner’s officials were summoned to the crash site at about 4:21 p.m., according to CHP logs. The identity of the person who died will be withheld at least until family has been notified.

No other injuries were immediately reported. Further details regarding what led up to the crash were not immediately available.

Authorities shut down both directions of the 73 toll road near the scene of the crash while CHP and coroner’s officials conducted an investigation, Olivera said. The transition from the southbound 55 Freeway to the southbound 73 toll road was also closed. Motorists were temporarily diverted onto Irvine Boulevard. All lanes were later reopened as of 7:50 p.m., according to CHP logs.


Source: Orange County Register

Orange County’s ‘Stand and Salute’ Giving Day focuses on military veterans

In military time, the Stand & Salute Giving Day online fundraising to benefit six nonprofits in Orange County who serve veterans and their families starts just after zero hundred hours on Thursday, June 17.

Civilians, that means a second after the stroke of midnight — or 12:00:01 a.m. Thursday.

Then, for the next 24 hours, military folk and civilians alike — anybody who wants to help veterans in Orange County — can find find match challenges and peer-to-peer outreach on social media to help fund organizations taking part in the fourth annual military-themed virtual Giving Day, all of which is being held under the auspices of Orange County Community Foundation’s philanthropic engine.

The Giving Day 2021 hopes to raise at least $125,000, up from the $90,000 benchmark that seven organizations exceeded during their collaborative fundraising day in May 2020. Last year’s Stand & Salute event brought in $153,000.

Orange County is home to more than 107,000 veterans, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s most recent American Community Survey. Although inroads have been made since a sweeping study commissioned by Orange County Community Foundation in 2015 pointed out the struggles many veterans face in transitioning from military to civilian life, an update last year showed areas that still need improvement.

Information on how the Giving Day might help can be found on a landing page at stand-and-salute-giving-day.ocnonprofitcentral.org. Also, all of the organizations taking part in the event have their own pages with details about who you’re funding and how to give.

Money raised during Stand & Salute will benefit organizations that provide resources to veterans and their family members. Those resources take the form of housing and food assistance, mental health services, employment guidance, help in accessing GI benefits, educational opportunities and financial literacy. It will go to these organizations:

• 2-1-1 OC, which features a veterans portal and connection to a veteran peer navigator

• Strong Families, Strong Children, a program of the Child Guidance Center

• Goodwill of Orange County’s Tierney Center for Veterans Services, a veteran-operated hub for resources and referrals

• Strength In Support (SIS), which specializes in behavioral health services

• Support the Enlisted Project, or STEP, and its focus on financial self-sufficiency

• Working Wardrobes and its VetNet services to help people transition from military life to civilian employment

Each of the nonprofits involved in this year’s Stand & Salute also set individual fundraising goals, ranging from $5,000 to $100,000, and have match opportunities to boost that fundraising.

Orange County residents have remained generous on other Giving Days, even as COVID-19 took lives and livelihoods, said Carol Ferguson, director of donor relations and programs for Orange County Community Foundation. She expects that financial support to continue on Thursday.

“People really care,” Ferguson said. “They want to help.”


Source: Orange County Register

House votes 406-21 to honor police who defended Capitol

By Annie Grayer and Kristin Wilson | CNN

Five months after the January 6 insurrection, the House and Senate have come to an agreement that will award the Congressional Gold Medal to the officers who defended the Capitol.

But 21 House Republicans refused to support the legislation, the latest reminder that members of Congress still cannot agree on the facts of the deadly Capitol Hill riot.

The final vote in the House on Tuesday was 406-21. The number of House Republicans voting against the bill nearly doubled since the first time a version of the bill came to the House floor, as the vote when the bill first passed the House in March was 413-12. Republican Rep. Lance Gooden of Texas was the only GOP member to vote no in March and change his vote to yes this time around.

Both the House and the Senate had passed their own resolutions to bestow the medals, but the initial pieces of legislation varied. The revised bills will now award three medals — one to the entire US Capitol Police force, and one to the Metropolitan Police Department, “so that the sacrifices of fallen officers and their families, and the contributions of other law enforcement agencies who answered the call of duty on January 6, 2021, can be recognized and honored in a timely manner.”

A third will be put on display at the Smithsonian Institution, with a plaque that lists all the law enforcement agencies that protected and defended the Capitol.

Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia told reporters that she voted against the Congressional Gold Medal to US Capitol Police Officers and MPD because she does not believe the legislation should refer to January 6 as an insurrection.

“I wouldn’t call it an insurrection” Greene told reporters.

Greene also said she had issue with the language of the bill that referred to the Capitol complex as “the temple of our American Democracy.”

“This is not a temple. That is for sure” Greene said.

Republican Rep. Thomas Massie of Kentucky also said his vote against the legislation was because of the language of the bill, specifically the references to the Capitol as a temple and January 6 as an insurrection.

“There are pending cases or trials right now, indictments against people, and I think if we called it an insurrection, it could have a bearing on their case,” he said. “If they just wanted to give the police recognition, they could have done it without trying to make it partisan,” he said.

When asked if he thought what happened on January 6 was an insurrection, he answered, “I think it was a mob but I don’t think it was an insurrection, no.”

Pressed again, he said, “they were protesting and I don’t approve of the way they protested, but it wasn’t an insurrection. My goodness. Can you imagine what a real insurrection would look like?”

Other members such as Rep. Andrew Clyde and Rep. Andy Biggs ignored questions from CNN asking to explain their vote.

Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger, who has been an outspoken critic of former President Donald Trump and his supporters that remain in the House, publicly criticized his 21 colleagues who voted against the legislation.

“How you can vote no to this is beyond me” Kinzinger tweeted after the vote. “Then again, denying an insurrection is as well. To the brave Capitol (and DC metro PD) thank you. To the 21: they will continue to defend your right to vote no anyway.”

In February, the Senate unanimously voted to award a Congressional Gold Medal to Officer Eugene Goodman, who singlehandedly led a mob of insurrectionists away from the Senate chamber minutes before the chamber doors were sealed with senators still inside. But the House version of the legislation opted to award the medal to the whole of the police force rather than singling out one individual for the medal.

The legislation does name several individual officers, including Goodman, for their valor, saying “Capitol Police Officers Brian Sicknick and Howard Liebengood, Metropolitan Police Department Officer Jeffrey Smith, and those who sustained injuries, and the courage of Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman, exemplify the patriotism and the commitment of Capitol Police officers, and those of other law enforcement agencies, to risk their lives in service of our country.”

The 21 Republicans who voted against the bill are:

Lauren Boebert of ColoradoJohn Rose of TennesseeAndy Harris of MarylandThomas Massie of KentuckyBob Good of VirginiaLouie Gohmert of TexasBarry Moore of AlabamaRalph Norman of South CarolinaMatt Rosendale of MontanaMarjorie Taylor Greene of GeorgiaChip Roy of TexasPaul Gosar of ArizonaAndy Biggs of ArizonaWarren Davidson of OhioScott Perry of PennsylvaniaMatt Gaetz of FloridaGreg Steube of FloridaAndrew Clyde of GeorgiaJody Hice of GeorgiaMary Miller of IllinoisMichael Cloud of Texas


Source: Orange County Register

Workers to picket Tenet hospitals over alleged understaffing, health insurance concerns

Workers plan to picket three Tenet Healthcare hospitals Wednesday, June 16, alleging the facilities are understaffed and have left some employees without health insurance while the company has received billions in federal COVID-19 relief funds and spent $1.1 billion to buy 45 surgery centers.

The employees, including respiratory therapists, housekeepers, nursing assistants and medical technicians, are represented by the National Union of Healthcare Workers (NUHW). They will gather outside Fountain Valley Regional Hospital and Los Alamitos Medical Center in Orange County and Lakewood Regional Medical Center in Los Angeles County.

The union represents nearly 1,000 workers at Tenet hospitals in Southern California.

In a letter sent Tuesday to U.S. Health and Human Services Director Xavier Becerra and Federal Trade Commission Chairwoman Rebecca Slaughter, NUHW said it supports a request from Rep. Katie Porter, D-Irvine, for a federal investigation into whether Tenet and other major hospital operators have misused their stimulus grants and COVID relief funds.

“There is ample evidence to suggest that Tenet Healthcare used COVID-relief funds to improperly expand its business, enrich its executives and shareholders and prioritize the company’s bottom line over patients and caregivers,” NUHW President Sal Rosselli said in the letter.

In a statement issued Tuesday, Tenet spokeswoman Jennifer Bayer said the company will continue to negotiate in good faith with the union in hopes of reaching a successful resolution.

“While we value all our employees who are represented by the NUHW, we are disappointed that the union is taking this approach,” she said.

Bayer noted that, while Tenent is in direct negotiations with service and maintenance workers as well as some technical employees, other environmental and dietary service employees represented by NUHW are negotiating with Compass Group, a contract vendor.

“In the recent past, the union has misled community members, elected officials and the public on our role in this matter,” she said. “We are not participants in those negotiations.”

Rosselli said Tenet’s top executives and Glenview Capital Management, the company’s largest shareholder, allegedly pocketed about $500 million from the sales of their Tenet stock.

And according to him, it didn’t end there.

“Tenet paid a combined $750,000 in bonuses to two top executives in its corporate headquarters for their work during the pandemic, even as many of Tenet’s frontline staff lacked health insurance, adequate PPE and access to COVID-19 testing,” Rosselli said.

Meanwhile, employees at the hospitals say staffing is stretched thin.

“We are dangerously understaffed on nearly every shift,” said Mailinh Nguyen, a nursing assistant at Fountain Valley Regional Hospital.

Rosselli said Tenet has refused to increase staffing or invest in its caregivers who put their lives on the line during the pandemic.

Maria Rocha, a subcontracted housekeeper at Lakewood Medical Center, said when she contracted COVID-19 she couldn’t afford to see a doctor even though she works at the hospital.

“Tenet had the funds to take care of everyone who worked in its hospitals,” she said. “It’s time to find out where the money went.”


Source: Orange County Register

Tuesday was the hottest day of 2021 — and Wednesday won’t be much different

It was the hottest day of the year in Southern California on Tuesday, June 15, and Wednesday could be about the same — not that your internal thermometer would likely recognize any small change.

“If it’s 2 degrees warmer or 2 degrees cooler, it won’t make much of a difference to anyone but us, because we like numbers,” said Phil Gonsalves, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in San Diego. “The more extreme the temperature is, the more difficult it is for our sensory mechanism to tell the difference.”

Gonsalves based his declaration that June 15 was the hottest day of 2021 — a smidgen warmer than on June 14 — by examining temperatures in Palm Springs and Riverside. Palm Springs International Airport recorded 117 degrees on Tuesday, 5 degrees higher than the day before. The 104-degree recording at Riverside Municipal Airport was also 5 degrees higher than on Monday.

Gonsalves was unsure whether Tuesday was the hottest day of the year in Orange County. Anaheim was at 94 degrees but was still topped by the 96 degrees on April 1. The Los Angeles/Oxnard weather service office did not have information available for its region.

Although temperatures will fall from now through Monday, it’s more of a less-hot trend than a cooling trend, especially in the Inland Empire. Temperatures are 20 degrees higher than usual for this time of year in some places. (Of course, if you live on the coast, it’s no sweat.)

“Oh, yeah. It’s way above normal,” Gonsalves said. “It’s not until Monday or Tuesday that we are going to have a significant decrease in temperatures.”

By then, the high in Riverside should be about 93 degrees; for the San Fernando Valley, the high should be down to 86 degrees. And Inland Orange County, which is largely avoiding 100-degrees days this week, will top out at a comfy 81 degrees on Monday.

In the meantime, though, advisories are in effect for dangerously high heat: High 90s and triple-digit temperatures are forecast for much of the region through Sunday.

Gonsalves explained how temperatures could be so far above normal this week. He said he notices that when he uses an air pump to fill a bicycle tire, the end he holds where the air comes out heats up because the air is being compressed. That’s the same scenario with the high-pressure system currently over the region: The more pressure from the gases stacked on top of each other in the atmosphere, the hotter the air gets.

The Riverside Office of Emergency Management on Tuesday cautioned residents of the region to recognize symptoms of heat exhaustion that include dizziness; excessive sweating; cool, pale or clammy skin; nausea; a rapid, faint pulse; and muscle cramps. Treatment should include moving to an air-conditioned location, drinking water and taking a cool shower or using cold compresses. Call 911 if a person loses consciousness.

Lucy Jones, the renowned seismologist and founder of the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society, suggested that heat can be a stealth killer in a podcast hosted by John Bwarie.

“Heat kills more people in the United States than any other meteorologic weather phenomenon,” Jones said. “It’s actually our most dangerous weather event but it doesn’t feel like that to us. Who’s afraid of it being hot? That’s just a summer day, right? We have to overcome that bias and recognize it as the danger that it is.”

The heat prompted at least two high school baseball games — one in Rancho Cucamonga and one in San Bernardino — to be moved from afternoon starts to morning first-pitches on Tuesday. Cooling centers have opened in many cities.

And in a bit of good timing, reservations are no longer required to splash around at the waterparks of Six Flags Hurricane Harbor in Valencia and Raging Waters in San Dimas. Knott’s Soak City in Buena Park still requires reservations but the ban on out-of-state visitors has been lifted.

For those who stayed home and turned on the air conditioning, there was good news: Southern California Edison had plenty of electricity to go around, said David Song, an SCE spokesman.

He encouraged customers to set their thermostats to no lower than 78 degrees, turn on ceiling fans, open windows and fill the fridge in order to reduce the amount of airspace to cool. Such conservation measures will help extend the life of SCE’s equipment, Song said.

Staff Writer Eric-Paul Johnson contributed to this report.

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Forecasted high temperatures for Wednesday:

Downtown Los Angeles: 93Long Beach: 78Pasadena: 97San Bernardino: 105Torrance: 81Redlands: 105Riverside: 101San Clemente: 77Santa Ana: 85Van Nuys: 98Whittier: 95

Source: National Weather Service


Source: Orange County Register

Evidence suggests COVID-19 was in US in late 2019

By Mike Stobbe | Associated Press

NEW YORK — A new analysis of blood samples from 24,000 Americans taken early last year is the latest and largest study to suggest that the new coronavirus popped up in the U.S. in December 2019 — weeks before cases were first recognized by health officials.

The analysis is not definitive, and some experts remain skeptical, but federal health officials are increasingly accepting a timeline in which small numbers of COVID-19 infections may have occurred in the U.S. before the world ever became aware of a dangerous new virus erupting in China.

“The studies are pretty consistent,” said Natalie Thornburg of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“There was probably very rare and sporadic cases here earlier than we were aware of. But it was not widespread and didn’t become widespread until late February,” said Thornburg, principal investigator of the CDC’s respiratory virus immunology team.

Such results underscore the need for countries to work together and identify newly emerging viruses as quickly and collaboratively as possible, she added.

The pandemic coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China in late 2019. Officially, the first U.S. infection to be identified was a traveler — a Washington state man who returned from Wuhan on Jan. 15 and sought help at a clinic on Jan. 19.

CDC officials initially said the spark that started the U.S. outbreak arrived during a three-week window from mid-January to early February. But research since then — including some done by the CDC — has suggested a small number of infections occurred earlier.

A CDC-led study published in December 2020 that analyzed 7,000 samples from American Red Cross blood donations suggested the virus infected some Americans as early as the middle of December 2019.

The latest study, published Tuesday online by the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, is by a team including researchers at the National Institutes of Health. They analyzed blood samples from more than 24,000 people across the country, collected in the first three months of 2020 as part of a long-term study called “All Of Us” that seeks to track 1 million Americans over years to study health.

Like the CDC study, these researchers looked for antibodies in the blood that are taken as evidence of coronavirus infection, and can be detected as early as two weeks after a person is first infected.

The researchers say seven study participants — three from Illinois, and one each from Massachusetts, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin — were infected earlier than any COVID-19 case was originally reported in those states.

One of the Illinois cases was infected as early as Christmas Eve, said Keri Althoff, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the study’s lead author.

It can be difficult to distinguish antibodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, from antibodies that fight other coronaviruses, including some that cause the common cold. Researchers in both the NIH and CDC studies used multiple types of tests to minimize false positive results, but some experts say it still is possible their 2019 positives were infections by other coronaviruses and not the pandemic strain.

“While it is entirely plausible that the virus was introduced into the United States much earlier than is usually appreciated, it does not mean that this is necessarily strong enough evidence to change how we’re thinking about this,” said William Hanage, a Harvard University expert on disease dynamics.

The NIH researchers have not followed up with study participants yet to see if any had traveled out of the U.S. prior to their infection. But they found it noteworthy that the seven did not live in or near New York City or Seattle, where the first wave of U.S. cases were concentrated.

“The question is how did, and where did, the virus take seed,” Althoff said. The new study indicates “it probably seeded in multiple places in our country,” she added.


Source: Orange County Register

Corona del Mar courtyard home with a 29-foot water wall seeks $35 million

  • The heated loggia with the pool and water wall beyond. (Photo by Modern Take)

  • The open-plan living space features floor-to-ceiling glass walls that frame ocean views. (Photo by Modern Take)

  • The kitchen has two center islands. (Photo by Modern Take)

  • The ocean-facing master bedroom opens on the back patio, with its in-ground spa. (Photo by Modern Take)

  • The back patio features a built-in barbecue, a fire pit and an in-ground spa. (Photo by Modern Take)

  • The master bathroom. (Photo by Modern Take)

  • The theater. (Photo by Modern Take)

  • A view of the courtyard at twilight. (Photo by Modern Take)

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An oceanfront cliffside home in Corona del Mar has come on the market for $35 million.

According to Multiple Listing Service data, the figure currently makes it the most expensive residential listing in the Newport Beach enclave.

Set on a near-half-acre lot in the upscale Cameo Shores neighborhood, the 7,000-square-foot house — one of 14 on Brighton Road, regarded as “Billionaires Row” — was completed in 2018. It features five bedrooms, six bathrooms and wraps around a central courtyard where a 29-foot water wall accents an infinity pool.

A heated loggia surrounds the courtyard.

An open floor plan, high beamed ceilings and glass walls that slide away to accommodate indoor-outdoor living define the interior.

Inside, double islands outfit the kitchen.

Highlights include the temperature-controlled 80-bottle wine closet.

A built-in sauna equips the home gym.

In the theater, there’s a backlit onyx bar and a full kitchen.

The ocean-facing master suite contains a fireplace, a luxurious bathroom with a glass-enclosed shower and a separate tub, and glass doors to the back patio.

“Enjoy the sound of crashing waves and the sight of mesmerizing sunsets from the backyard, complete with a built-in barbecue, cozy fire pit and in-ground spa,” the listing reads.

Direct access to the beach is yet another perk.

Adrienne Brandes of Surterre Properties holds the listing

The property last sold in 2019 for $20 million.


Source: Orange County Register

Students from Tarzana, Orange County advance to National Spelling Bee quarterfinals

By STEVEN HERBERT | City News Service

LOS ANGELES — The quarterfinals of the 93rd Scripps National Spelling Bee will be held Tuesday with a 13-year-old from Tarzana and two 13-year-olds from Orange County among the 74 remaining competitors from the original field of 207.

Irene Thomas of Tarzana began Saturday’s preliminaries by correctly spelling diapason, a noun meaning a full, rich outpouring of harmonious sound. She then correctly answered the word-meaning question, “Something metatarsal is?” by choosing “relating to the part of the foot that forms the instep”

In the third round, she correctly spelled torero, a noun meaning a matador or one of the supporting team.

Spelling bee competitor Irene Thomas graduated from eighth grade at the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies in Tarzana. (Image from the Scripps National Spelling Bee)

When asked by City News Service how hard were the words she had to spell and give the correct definition for on Saturday, Irene responded by email, “They were mediocre. I think the more words you encounter and patterns you notice, the easier spelling and defining will be.”

Irene said she had seen diapason and metatarsal in the word list bee organizers had provided her, but not torero.

“I had heard of similar words of Spanish origin, so I pieced it together,” Irene said.

The quarterfinals will consist of three rounds and be completed one round at a time.

“Based on the preliminary words, some words will be challenging for sure,” Irene said.

The second round of each level of the competition — the preliminaries, quarterfinals, semifinals and finals — will be a word meaning round, requiring the speller to orally select the correct multiple choice answer to a vocabulary question read by the pronouncer.

This new element of the competition is designed to challenge the spellers and further advance the bee’s focus on word knowledge and literacy.

Questions have been prepared by noted linguist and lexicographer Ben Zimmer, language columnist for The Wall Street Journal. The speller will have 30 seconds to view the question and the three answer choices. The speller must answer correctly within the time limit to move on to the next round of competition.

Irene graduated Friday from eighth grade at the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies, a fourth- through 12th-grade magnet school in Tarzana. It kept its original name after moving to the site of the former Sequoia Junior High School in 1980.

Spelling bee competitor Baominh Le graduated from eighth grade at The Pegasus School in Huntington Beach. (Image from the Scripps National Spelling Bee)

The two Orange County spellers — Baominh Le and Sophia Lin — both graduated Thursday from The Pegasus School, a private, pre-kindergarten through eighth grade school in Huntington Beach that had 583 students in the just completed school year.

James Swiger, the school’s middle school director, attributed both Baominh and Sophia’s spelling bee success to being avid readers.

Baominh is “always energetic,” Swiger said.

“It’s a sight to behold when he gets excited about a topic,” Swiger said. “Baominh is one who revels in learning and academics.”

Swiger said “Baominh has a warm and kind spirit. He’s always ready to offer a helping hand, and enjoys engaging in good conversation.”

Spelling bee competitor Sophia Lin graduated from eighth grade at The Pegasus School in Huntington Beach. (Image from the Scripps National Spelling Bee)

Swiger described Sophia as “an incredibly hardworking scholar who doesn’t leave anything on the table.”

“When class starts, she’s prepared to make the most of the experience, ask questions and dive deep into understanding,” Swiger said.

Sophia is “confident in herself and not afraid to use her voice when needed, but she’s also one who offers a warm smile to everyone and is a good friend,” Swiger said.

Swiger called Sophia “a driven scholar and a unique young lady.”

“She will be a mover and a shaker in the days to come,” Swiger said.

Baominh’s first word Saturday was meiosis, the process of cell division in sexually reproducing organisms that reduces the number of chromosomes from diploid to haploid. He then chose the correction definition for stamina, staying power.

Baominh’s final word of the day was gallowglass, the mercenary warrior elite among Gaelic-Norse clans residing in the Western Isles of Scotland and Scottish Highlands from the mid-13th century to the end of the 16th century.

Sophia first correctly spelled scintillation, a flash of light produced in a phosphor by absorption of an ionizing particle or photon. She correctly defined oblique as slanting in direction or position.

Sophia’s final word to spell Saturday was copestone, the highest point, as of achievement.

Saturday’s preliminaries consisted of three rounds of oral competition, which took 11 1/2 hours to complete. There were 69 spellers who misspelled their first-round word, reducing the field to 138.

The field was further cut to 110 after the second round and 74 after the third.

The quarterfinals will be televised by the streaming service ESPN3 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. All spellers spelling both words correctly and correctly answering the word meaning question will advance to the semifinals, which will be held June 27.

All competition through the semifinals will be held on a virtual basis. The top 10 to 12 finalists will travel to the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex near Orlando, Florida, for the finals, which will be held July 8.

No speller from Los Angeles or Orange counties has won the bee.


Source: Orange County Register

Man arrested, suspected of molesting 3 teens in after-school program in Anaheim

SANTA ANA — A 26-year-old man was behind bars Monday on charges of molesting three teenage boys in an afterschool program at a charter school in Anaheim.

Justin Dean Evans is charged with four counts of lewd acts on a minor younger than 14 and one count each of committing a forcible lewd act on a child and an attempted lewd act on a child younger than 14, all felonies.

Evans worked in an after-school program for Goals, a charter school in Anaheim, when he met the boys and allegedly sexually assaulted them in 2018 and 2019, when they were about 13 years old, according to Anaheim police Sgt. Shane Carringer.

Evans, who is being held on $1 million bail, is scheduled to be arraigned June 30 in the jail courtroom in Santa Ana.


Source: Orange County Register

Anaheim tattoo artist charged in sexual assaults of 2 customers

A 40-year-old tattoo artist was charged Monday, June 14, in connection with sexual assaults of two customers in Anaheim, police said.

Prosecutors charged Manuel Jesus Pech with a count of sexual battery and two counts of sexual penetration by a foreign object, all felonies, according to online court records. The tattoo artist is suspected of assaulting two customers while working out of his home in Anaheim.

One was a 17-year-old girl who was victimized during a session on Feb. 23, 2019, Anaheim Police Sgt. Shane Carringer said. The other was a 25-year-old woman who received a tattoo from Pech on March 1, 2017.


Source: Orange County Register

Southern California communities to swelter on scorching hot Tuesday

Drink plenty of water and stay in a cool place, preferably with an air conditioner, on Tuesday, June 15, which weather experts predict will the hottest day this week in many Southern California communities.

“This is not typical for this time of year,” said Philip Gonsalves, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

He said typical temperatures this time of year are much lower, depending on where you are.

Weather experts believe records will be broken Tuesday. The record of 95 degrees set in 2018 for Anaheim will probably be replaced, Gonsalves said, adding that the forecast for Anaheim on Tuesday is  98 degrees.

The current record for Palm Springs is 116 degrees which was set on June 15, 1961, and Palm Springs is expected to see 120-degree weather on Tuesday, Gonsalves said.

The forecast is 106 degrees for Palmdale, which has a current record of 105 degrees set in 1966, said Rich Thompson, also a National Weather Service meteorologist.

  • Anthony Negrete, 9-years old, cools off at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People cool off at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People cool off at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People cool off at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Anthony Negrete, 9-years old, cools off at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Emily Lopez, 8-years old, swims at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People cool off at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People cool off at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Amber Silva cools off with son Able Negrete, 6-yeas old, at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Kaylee Ruiz, 11-years old, swims at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Emily Lopez, 8-years old, dives in to the water at the Northridge Park Aquatic Center, Monday, June 14, 2021. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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But Gonsalves doubted the record will be broken in Riverside which is expected to reach 106 degrees on Tuesday. He pointed out that the current record is 114 degrees which was reached on June 15, 1917.

“I believe that record will stand for awhile,” he said.

The current heat wave is tied to a high-pressure system centered where Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah meet, Gonsalves said. He said it will intensify the next several days and shift toward Southern California.

“It will dominate our weather for the rest of the week,” Gonsalves said.

On Tuesday, Thompson said downtown Los Angeles will see temperatures in the low to mid 90s while the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and San Gabriel valleys will reach temperatures ranging from 100 to 108.

The National Weather Service issued an excessive heat warning from Tuesday morning to Wednesday night for the San Fernando Valley, San Gabriel Valley, Santa Clarita Valley, the Antelope Valley and the mountains, according to Thompson. He said there is an excessive heat watch for coastal areas in Los Angeles County for Tuesday and Wednesday.

He said it will still be warm Thursday and Friday, but a bit cooler.

There is also an excessive heat watch for the San Fernando, San Gabriel and Santa Clarita valleys from Wednesday night to Friday night, according to the National Weather Service.

A warning means weather experts have a high confidence a particular weather event will occur, Thompson said. A watch means the potential is there but they are less confident the weather event will occur.

There is an excessive heat warning from Tuesday morning to Saturday morning for the Inland Empire, where high temperatures could reach 100 to 110 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. During the same time period, it will be hotter in Apple Valley, Lucerne Valley, Victorville and Hesperia where the temperatures are expected to hit between 105 to 115 degrees.

There is an excessive heat watch for inland Orange County cities such as Anaheim, Santa Ana, Orange and Fullerton from Tuesday morning to Friday night, Gonsalves said. He added that the coastal communities in Orange County will see temperatures in the upper 70s to 80s on Tuesday. Temperatures in the coastal areas will be in the mid to upper 70s for the rest of the week.

When temperatures are expected to reach at least 100 degrees, the Redlands Community Senior Center, 111 W. Lugonia Ave., and the Joslyn Senior Center, 21 Grant St., will open from noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday as cooling centers, according to a city statement.

Fontana will have two cooling centers for those seeking respite from 100-degree or higher heat: the Fontana Community Senior Center at 16710 Ceres Ave. and Heritage Neighborhood Center at 7350 W. Liberty Pkwy. The cooling centers will be open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Times may vary depending upon the temperature.

Another center will open in Glendale at the Pacific Community Center,  501 S. Pacific Ave.

Residents in San Bernardino County can call 211 or check 211sb.org for a cooling center near them.

To find a cooling center in Los Angeles County, call 211 or go to ready.lacounty.gov/heat/

Riverside County residents can check capriverside.org/Cool-Centers for cooling centers.

The city of Riverside has cooling centers open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. this week: Arlanza Community Center / Bryant Park at 7950 Philbin Ave.; César Chávez Community Center/Bobby Bonds Park at 2060 University Ave.; Dales Senior Center (Seniors Only) at 3936 Chestnut St.; Janet Goeske Senior Center (Seniors Only) at 5257 Sierra St.; La Sierra Community Center at 5215 La Sierra Ave.; La Sierra Senior Center (Seniors Only) at 5215 La Sierra Ave., Bldg. B; Stratton Center/Bordwell Park at 2008 Martin Luther King Blvd. and Ysmael Villegas Community Center at 3091 Esperanza St.

Forecasted high temperatures for Tuesday:

Dana Point: 85Fullerton: 98Long Beach: 89Downtown Los Angeles: 96Pasadena: 102Van Nuys: 102San Bernardino: 109Torrance: 89Redlands: 108Riverside: 106Whittier: 98

Source: National Weather Service

 


Source: Orange County Register